Monday, 27 October 2014

MOSCOW MONDAY

ST BASIL'S CATHEDRAL AND THE ENTRANCE TO RED SQUARE
Monday morning before my flight home I make out a small tour of Red Square, my driver drops me off outside St Basil’s church. Its coloured minarets and golden crosses impale a grey sky.

The tomb of Lenin, plain and imposing by its simplicity: marble black and the colour of dried blood. I am asked by an elderly couple to take the photo outside the mausoleum.








To the airport, via the Metro system train, a worrisome experience as I try to correlate my travel map with the station signs in Cyrillic. By chance I get off at the right station and see striking brass Soviet insignias embedded in the marble roof of the concourse of the airport express train stop.

LENIN'S PLACE OF REST

MOSCOW METRO STATION

MOSCOW: THE MAP IS NOT THE TERRAIN

Friday, 24 October 2014

MOSCOW WEEKEND

MOSCOW: A CHURCH A FEW MINUTES FROM THE OFFICE
On Saturday my colleagues tell me of a church only three minutes from the office. I arrive to the chime of bells.

Many bells in a sound unfamiliar, I attempt to capture this on my phone.  It is music composition created all by one man, the prelude to a service inside.


A great city that has a great river snaking through it. Grand buildings are part of capital build to impress, remodelled by Joseph Stalin.

The Moskva River clasps to the last rays of a murky sunset.  It is the end of my work here. Sunday and two fishermen loll against the stone balustrades along the river in the hope of a catch.



THE MOSKVA RIVER  CLINGS TO THE SUNSET 

Wednesday, 22 October 2014

MOSCOW FRIDAY

After the first day my driver returns me to my hotel. I grab my drawing book and venture out. The sun is setting behind the great fa├žade of Kievsky Station.

People are hurrying home, it is Friday, party night in Moscow. A Hare Krishna band makes music an on a bench near by a party has already started.

MOSCOW KIEVSKY STATION

Tuesday, 30 September 2014

ORKNEY A FINAL FRIDAY – CAIRNS AND BATTERIES


Overland to go underground; down a farm track and through the farmyard is Rennibister Earth House. This underground Iron Age structure was discovered when a threshing machine broke through the roof in 1926!
Again it easy to get into, we climbed down some steps and had a good poke around inside.   It was probably where dairy products, meats and such were keep cool and fresh.  On emerging we saw the farmer and chatted to him for a while about the chamber in his yard, his livestock and his farming world; the price of a fat lamb and the cost of a fleece and the price it is likely to fetch this year.
We gaze across a wider landscape: punctuated by fields


Cuween Hill is further along and a steep walk up to a Neolithic Chambered Cairn. We crawl through a narrow passage to the main chamber that is over 2 meters high, to appreciate the workmanship of 4,500 years ago. Scottish Heritage thoughtfully provided two flashlights in a box by the entrance to ensure our enjoyment.

The Ness Battery at Stromness is another ‘that will be £6 please’ experience and we had not booked so did not get it. But through the mist and drizzle we saw enough of the Battery and the interesting buildings that surround it, search light battery, small gun emplacements to get some sense of how important these outposts were with their six inch guns with a range of 7 miles.
Again two World Wars have left a mark and points of fascinating interest.

A war mark



In Orkney there is a welcome and an adventure around every bend in the road. We were coming to the end of a wonderful two weeks and laying plans to come again next year.

ORKNEY FOOTNOTE THURSDAY - BACK TO ST MAGNUS


We wanted a closer look at the woodcarvings and other loveliness with St Magnus Cathedral. When you look at the nave and chapel of Rognvald with a replica of a small Viking ship on the alter you appreciate the strong links to Norway and the Vikings. There are some lovely Romanesque features that probably created by the same English masons who may have worked on Durham.
Upon the Chapel a Viking Ship 



Across from the cathedral is the Orkney Museum into which we popped on several occasions. The Orkney Museum takes you easily from the Stone Age, to the Picts and Vikings, right through to the present day. On this occasion we were keen to see the box in which St Magnus’s bones were discovered in the Middle Ages. The whole place is a treasure trove!  It was great playing with the Runic alphabet to spell my name and making a rubbing of Viking Breast Plate.